Piano

Ryuichi Sakamoto works with giants and with glaciers

Composer found music even in the frigid waters of the Arctic Sea.  Nick Krewen Special to the Star, Mon Oct 25 2010 Over 80 albums and 32 years, revered Japanese cultural icon Ryuichi Sakamoto — who made a rare Toronto concert appearance Sunday at the Queen Elizabeth Centre — has dabbled in a lot of genres. Since he graduated from his electronic music studies at Tokyo’s University of Art, Sakamoto,…


Ageless Paul McCartney charms crowd with inspirational performance

Entertainment / Music He may have recently turned 68, but Paul McCartney performed like a man one-quarter of his age before an adoring Toronto crowd. Paul McCartney performs during the first of two nights in Toronto at the Air Canada Centre on Aug. 8, 2010. Nick Krewen Special to the Star Published on Mon Aug 09 2010     Baby, we’re amazed! He may have recently turned 68, but Paul McCartney performed…


Toronto’s Darrelle London gets a little help from Perez Hilton

Entertainment / Music Darrelle London, who plays the Horseshoe on Wednesday, is getting a bit of attention is via Perez Hilton, who has signed her to his record label.   Nick Krewen Special to the Star, Published on Sun May 23 2010 She’s getting the Perez push. Before she became involved with gossip blogger Mario Lavandeira, a.k.a. Perez Hilton, a.k.a. the self-described Queen Of All Media, Toronto singer and songwriter Darrelle London…


Rufus Wainwright – Flamboyant Performer Keeps Up the Family Tradition

Versions of this article ran in Southam newspapers after May 13, including the Hamilton Spectator Nick Krewen If your parents were a pair of famous folk icons, you might just be a little intimidated about embarking on your own recording career. Not Rufus Wainwright. Already hailed by hip lifestyle magazine Details as “one to watch in ’98,” the Montreal-born piano-playing son of Kate McGarrigle and Loudon Wainwright III (remember “Dead…


Mike Oldfield talks Songs of Distant Earth

NICK KREWEN Mike Oldfield, the British composer of Tubular Bells, the chart-topping 1973 instrumental album that revolutionized rock music and represented progressive rock at its most indulgent, sees future music entertainment as “a Salvadore Dali painting you can walk into.” Limited copies of his new album, Songs Of Distant Earth, contain a multi-media CD-ROM that he assembled midway through recording sessions, and Oldfield says he’s excited by new computer technology. “I…